Memoir Author Ingrid Ricks Shares 7 Tips for Marketing Your Memoir

by Matilda Butler on November 8, 2011

Book Business PaperclipPost #84 – Women’s Memoirs, Book Business – Kendra Bonnett and Matilda Butler

Memoir Book Marketing. An Author’s Perspective

Every once in a while, when Kendra and I talk to an author, we find a shared passion for marketing as well as memoir writing. Ingrid Ricks is one of these souls. On our website, we quoted the opening lines to her memoir Hippie Boy: A Girl’s Story way back when — before it was published — before we had ever communicated with her. We found that her character development was strong from the first word.

Then recently, she contacted us to see if we’d review her book. This lead to a great article by Ingrid. If you missed it, here’s the link.

When we saw that we shared much of the same philosophy about marketing a memoir, we invited Ingrid to write an article for our site. You’ll find her experiences with publishing and marketing on Story Circle Network’s Telling HerStories blog today.

Then below, she wraps up her experiences with her 7 Memoir Marketing Tips that she wants to share with you. These are right on. You may want to post her list on your cork board or white board or wherever you keep notes that help focus you.

7 Tips for Marketing Your Memoir

By Ingrid Ricks, author of Hippie Boy, a Girls Story

Memoir, memoir marketing, book marketing, memoir writing, editing a memoirThanks to Amazon, the eBook revolution and social media, the publishing world has been turned on its head. The playing field hasn’t just been leveled; it’s been handed on a platter to authors. But in order to capitalize on this exciting new world, authors have to know how to leverage social media and fill the role once performed by publishers.

Below are seven key secrets that I’ve learned are essential for successfully publishing your memoir – whether going the traditional or self-pub route.

1. Build a Platform. The time to start is now. Get involved with Scribd, Open Salon, Smith Magazine and any other online writing platform you can find, and start sharing your writing with the world.

2. Launch a Book Page and Engage in Social Media. If you don’t already have a web site, WordPress is a fantastic, inexpensive way to go. Get your book page up, launch an author Facebook page, get involved with Twitter, LinkedIn, Google + and any other social network you can keep up with.

3. Write the BEST Book You Can Write. Don’t rush this. You’ve got one shot; so make it count. Take writing classes, seek critiques and rewrite, rewrite, rewrite until your book is the best it can be.

4. Hire an Editor. Once you are happy with your manuscript, hire the best editor you can find to evaluate your manuscript and point out the weaknesses so you can take your book to the next level. And once the rewriters are done, hire a proofreader.

5. Develop a Great Title. Think catchy, interesting, unique—something that will grab the attention of readers.

6. Write a Book Proposal. Whether going the traditional or self-pub route, you need to know who your target market is and how you plan to reach them, because the marketing job is on you.

7. Design a Book Cover that Pops. Even if you plan on going the traditional publishing route, you need to start marketing your book and building a platform well in advance and having a compelling cover is critical to attracting readers. Also remember that the cover needs to pop even as a small thumbnail because that’s how it will appear on most social media sites and online book stores.

memoir, memoir writing, memoir marketing, writing

About the Author
Ingrid Ricks is a Seattle-based writer and speaker who focuses on living life to the fullest. She is the author of Hippie Boy: A Girl’s Story, a compelling true story about a teenage girl who escapes her abusive Mormon stepfather and the suffocating poverty and religion at home by joining her dad on the road as a tool-selling vagabond—until his arrest forces her to take charge of her life. For more information, visit: www.ingridricks.com









{ 2 comments… read them below or add one }

Linda Austin November 10, 2011 at

Great tips, Ingrid! I would add that the book proposal should be done while you are writing the first draft and forming your story, but preferably before you even start, so you know your message/focus and exactly the audience you’re “talking” to and can include what they will want to hear. Write marketing points into the book. Saves a lot of reworking later.

Ingrid Ricks November 10, 2011 at

Good point, Linda. (Though I know for me…I had a story I wanted to tell and so I had to tell that story and
then figure out the market afterward). Of course, I always seem to do things the hard way:)

Best,
Ingrid

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