catnav-interviews-active-3Post #236 – Memoir Writing Tips – Matilda Butler



More Memoir Insights from Nora Ephron

I’ve long admired Nora Ephron. Her screenwriting talents were impressive. One year ago today, Valentine’s Day, my partner and I watched three favorite films that showcase her writing prowess (and just happen to be romantic) — When Harry Met Sally, You’ve Got Mail, and Sleepless in Seattle. A fun day.

I recently learned more about Nora Ephron’s early writing experiences from Chip and Dan Heath’s 2007 book Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die. The authors interviewed Ephron and she recalled for them the first day of her high school journalism class when the teacher gave the students their assignment. They were to write the first sentence of a newspaper story — the sentence called the lead (AKA lede) — that all-important beginning. The teacher provided the necessary facts:

“Kenneth L. Peters, the principal of Beverly Hills High School, announced today that the entire high school faculty will travel to Sacramento next Thursday for a colloquium in new teaching methods. Among the speakers will be anthropologist Margaret Mead, college president Dr. Robert Maynard Hutchins, and California governor Edmund ‘Pat’ Brown.”

The students began to write the first lead in what many hoped would be a successful career in journalism. The authors say that Ephron and all her fellow students began to pound away on their manual typewriters reordering and condensing the facts into a single sentence: “Governor Pat Brown, Margaret Mead, and Robert Maynard Hutchins will address the Beverly Hills High School faculty Thursday in Sacramento…blah, blah, blah.”

Nora Ephron continued her story saying that the teacher picked up all the pieces of paper and scanned them before tossing them aside. He looked at the students and said, “The lead to the story is ‘There will be no school next Thursday.’”

I immediately saw how the teacher had moved the students away from just the “factual story” to the “readers of the story.” In other words, what in the story mattered to the reader.

Ephron went on, “It was a breathtaking moment. In that instant I realized that journalism was not just about regurgitating the facts but about figuring out the point. It wasn’t enough to know the who, what, when, and where; you had to understand what it meant. And why it mattered.”

Here’s Your Memoir Takeaway

When you write, think about your readers…the meaning of your story for your readers. Consider your story from their perspective. True, the memoir is about you, but it needs to be told with the perspective of your reader in mind.

Now, go back and read the first sentence in your memoir. Can you improve it? Then go to the first sentence, the lead, of each chapter. Imagine you are a reader rather than the writer. Does the sentence engage you and provide you with meaning?

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Interview with Sharon C. Jenkins, Memoir-Self Help Author and Marketer

by Matilda ButlerFebruary 7, 2017
Interview with Sharon C. Jenkins, Memoir-Self Help Author and Marketer

Sharon C. Jenkins, author and book marketer, talks with Matilda Butler about her memoir/self-help book Beyond the Closet Door.

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Memoirists — Consider Your Story Structure, Plus Memoir Writing Prompts

by Matilda ButlerJanuary 24, 2017
Memoirists — Consider Your Story Structure, Plus Memoir Writing Prompts

Matilda Butler discusses story structure and provides memoir writing prompts to help you consider your story structure.

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Dear Pamela, Memoir Advice Columnist, Answers Your Questions

by Pamela JaneJanuary 17, 2017
Dear Pamela, Memoir Advice Columnist, Answers Your Questions

It’s 2017 and Dear Pamela is back with more great advice and tips on memoir writing. Be sure to check out her latest responses and then send us your question to be answered.

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Memoir Writing Tiny Tip #8: Memoir Boundaries

by Matilda ButlerJanuary 10, 2017
Memoir Writing Tiny Tip #8: Memoir Boundaries

Matilda Butler gives you another in her Memoir Tiny Tip series. Learn about the value of a memoir boundary and when you should give your reader a peek outside.

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Memoir Writing Prompt: Take this Idea to Your Holiday Table

by Matilda ButlerDecember 20, 2016
Memoir Writing Prompt: Take this Idea to Your Holiday Table

Matilda Butler shares her idea for introducing memoir storytelling into your holidays. It doesn’t even require that you allocate time for writing. Just perfect for the busy host.

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Memoir Writing Tiny Tip #7: You Deserve a Mulligan

by Matilda ButlerDecember 6, 2016
Memoir Writing Tiny Tip #7: You Deserve a Mulligan

Matilda Butler gives you another in her Memoir Tiny Tip series. Find out how you get a Memoir Mulligan.

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